Monday, January 20, 2020

The Ambiguous Line Between Right and Wrong in My Sisters Keeperby Jodi

There is an ambiguous line between right and wrong that can cause difficulty when making decisions. Jodi Picoult's My Sister's Keeper demonstrates the grey area between right and wrong through a family's struggle with ethics. First, Anna's character struggles to do what is right while keeping the consequences of her actions in mind. Second, Sara's conflict with society shows how problematic it can be to do what seems right for one's family. Finally, the symbolism of stars and dark matter depicts how natural it can be to overlook what is unjust and only see what is right. Through Anna's character, Sara's conflict with society, and the symbolism of stars and dark matter, Picoult's My Sister's Keeper suggests that in order to do what is right, one may have to do what is perceived as wrong. First, Anna faces many challenges when making decisions that could have both positive and negative results surrounding her sister's acute promyelocytic leukemia. To begin with, Anna is a mature and independent teenager who is capable of making her own decisions. Anna does not want to involuntarily donate a kidney to her sister, Kate, so she sues her parents for medical emancipation. By wanting full rights to her own body, which she is entitled to, Anna's actions are perceived as selfish and morally wrong because she is risking Kate's life. Eventually, at the climax of the novel, Anna demonstrates that she is compassionate by disclosing her hidden motive. Anna admits that Kate â€Å"asked me to kill her† (Picoult 388), revealing her real reason for filing a lawsuit. Because Anna is doing this as the result of her sister's wish to die, she is doing the right thing for Kate, demonstrating that her â€Å"wrong† is really a â€Å"right†. Ironically by the end of th.. . ...which is unfair for the overlooked star but good for its twin. Stars and dark matter symbolize the difficulty there is in understanding and making decisions based on both what is right and what is wrong. In conclusion, Picoult's My Sister's Keeper suggests that there is an ambiguous line between doing what is right and what is wrong, as shown through Anna's character, Sara's conflict with society, and the symbolism of stars and dark matter. First, Anna struggles to balance her values and their repercussions. Second, Sara comes across many battles against society as she tries to do what is right for her family. Finally, the symbolism of stars and dark matter shows how what is right can outshine what is also wrong. The overlap of what is thought to be right and what is thought to be wrong makes the reader contemplate his or her own decisions, and judgements of others. The Ambiguous Line Between Right and Wrong in My Sister's Keeperby Jodi There is an ambiguous line between right and wrong that can cause difficulty when making decisions. Jodi Picoult's My Sister's Keeper demonstrates the grey area between right and wrong through a family's struggle with ethics. First, Anna's character struggles to do what is right while keeping the consequences of her actions in mind. Second, Sara's conflict with society shows how problematic it can be to do what seems right for one's family. Finally, the symbolism of stars and dark matter depicts how natural it can be to overlook what is unjust and only see what is right. Through Anna's character, Sara's conflict with society, and the symbolism of stars and dark matter, Picoult's My Sister's Keeper suggests that in order to do what is right, one may have to do what is perceived as wrong. First, Anna faces many challenges when making decisions that could have both positive and negative results surrounding her sister's acute promyelocytic leukemia. To begin with, Anna is a mature and independent teenager who is capable of making her own decisions. Anna does not want to involuntarily donate a kidney to her sister, Kate, so she sues her parents for medical emancipation. By wanting full rights to her own body, which she is entitled to, Anna's actions are perceived as selfish and morally wrong because she is risking Kate's life. Eventually, at the climax of the novel, Anna demonstrates that she is compassionate by disclosing her hidden motive. Anna admits that Kate â€Å"asked me to kill her† (Picoult 388), revealing her real reason for filing a lawsuit. Because Anna is doing this as the result of her sister's wish to die, she is doing the right thing for Kate, demonstrating that her â€Å"wrong† is really a â€Å"right†. Ironically by the end of th.. . ...which is unfair for the overlooked star but good for its twin. Stars and dark matter symbolize the difficulty there is in understanding and making decisions based on both what is right and what is wrong. In conclusion, Picoult's My Sister's Keeper suggests that there is an ambiguous line between doing what is right and what is wrong, as shown through Anna's character, Sara's conflict with society, and the symbolism of stars and dark matter. First, Anna struggles to balance her values and their repercussions. Second, Sara comes across many battles against society as she tries to do what is right for her family. Finally, the symbolism of stars and dark matter shows how what is right can outshine what is also wrong. The overlap of what is thought to be right and what is thought to be wrong makes the reader contemplate his or her own decisions, and judgements of others.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

How far do Stalin’s fears and suspicions account for the extent of the terror in the USSR in the years 1936-39?

One of the definitive factors of Stalin’s Russia is the mass array of terror he cast over his nation during his tyrannous reign which was fuelled by purges of people from all walks of life; this stemmed from kulaks on the collectivised farming to ‘saboteurs’ in the industrial aspects who were said to be at fault for un met quotas. Stalin held his country in peril, but for what reason?Ultimately it can be regarded as a disproportionate amount of fear and suspicion blinding Stalin in extenuating paranoia thus leading to the terror seen in the years from 1936-39. Although this is not the full reason, it must also be taken into account the economic difficulties and external threats faced at the time, so Stalin’s fear is not the full reason to the extent of the terror.Notably, in 1936 Stalin declared the Soviet Union was in â€Å"a state of siege† which lead to his progressive terrorising of the Soviet Union. The key origin of the terror that unfolded is often remarked as the murder of Kirov on the 1st of December 1934. Stalin was said to become suspicious of others and is likely to have feared for himself after the death of this highly regarded member of the central committee because it could indicate that someone was attempting to overthrow him.This fear of losing his power is to and extent accountable for the terror which took place, in particular the purges of the party because these are likely to be the people who wanted his position so he would have been suspicious that these were the one that wanted him dead and therefore they had to be cleansed- this, if true it would be a driving factor because Stalin wanted more than anything to maintain his power. However, it has been postulated that the murder of Kirov was an elaborate plot devised by Stalin.Kirov was said to at times receive more applause than Stalin in meetings, this demonstrates that Kirov was highly popular and because he opposed the speed of industrialisation and ex treme measures of party discipline Stalin may have not wanted him to be impressionable on other party members, which he clearly was exemplified by him receiving more applause than Stalin a man who was clapped where ever he went.So overall it appears rather apparent that whether the murder was or  was not organised by Stalin fear was a fore frontal element which drove him to the terror as Kirov portrays how he thought of party members may change ideas of others over his so he had to therefore eradicate them hence accounting for the terror which transpired. Although this cannot be fully noted as simply as fear because relating back to the fact Kirov received more applause could show that his death and the purges were a result of Stalin’s irrational jealousy of others and not fear, he wanted to ensure he remained top and was jealous of any who even mirrored in the slightest his appraisal.Contrary to jealousy, a factor which heightens the portrayal that fear and suspicion were the driving force is the rise of fascism at the time. In March 1936, just before Stalin sprung his terror on the party and military, Hitler reoccupied the demilitarised zone of the Rhineland and much to Stalin’s disarray his supposed western allies did nothing but idly stand by. This may have created fear in Stalin and alarmed him of the fascist threat spiralling into him attempting to liquidate not only his external but also his internal enemies.Combined with this it has been postulated that he was haunted by the fate of Nicholas II who had been brought down by a mixture of internal and external enemies, with this in his mind Stalin would not want to suffer the same fate hence we see how he would have been fearful of this possibility. Supporting this is the fact that in August 1936 Zinoviev and Kamenev were pulled out of prison and put on a show trial, accompanied by 14 other oppositionist group members in the party.From this we can deduce that suspicion was a driving factor in Stalin’s motivation for the purges because he was obviously mindful of the past which led to him to prevent it from happening- and this meant the terror which he unleashed on the party to prevent this and also on the military to prevent the new force of fascism seeing to his downfall (so yet again mindful of the external threats fuelled by his fear).In agreement with this idea is the fact that from members of the central committee in 1934 by 1938 70 percent of them were dead, if we link this back to the as fore mentioned idea that Stalin planned the murder of Kirov, we see an un disputable depiction of Stalin’s terror unleashed on the party and because of the former it was fuelled by his fear and contrite of potential downfall at the hands of others and he did see an apparent  threat in the form of members such as Kirov.In stark contrast, it cannot be regarded that Stalin’s fear and suspicion were the soul contributor to the extent of the terror; Stalinâ⠂¬â„¢s very personality is notably a dominant factor to the outbreak of the terror. Stalin’s cult of personality refers to how he dominated every aspect of Soviet life, he was no longer a leader but an embodiment of the nation itself- communism was now what Stalin said and did.One famous Russian politics of the time Khrushev who went on to lead the soviet union during the cold war and who had worked with Stalin stated that â€Å" Stalin is hope, Stalin is expectation†¦. Stalin is our victory†. From this account it begins to enlighten us to how Stalin must have been a rather self-absorbed man, this is displayed by firstly on Stalin’s 50th birthday in 1929, a huge all day parade and celebrations were held were tanks and soldiers were deployed to march through the streets and on may day celebrations planes flew overhead with portraits of Stalin.Through this depiction of how his cult of personality presented him as this man who highly thought of himself it pres ents how he idealised himself as the hero of the revolution, a genius who alone could take Russia forward to socialism and effect the transformation of the country, and who therefore could not be thwarted.Not only do this ideas contrast such that he was fearful, because as he thought of him-self in such prestige and being so powerful he had no reason to fear and consequently this could not have been the reason for his terror, but it also provides an explanation to why he had to get rid of the Bolshevik who knew that he was not this all-encompassing hero, because they would still have Lenin’s testament in their minds where Stalin was denounced by the man the Russian people saw as a God, so they would not accept him in the light he saw himself and may try to thwart him therefore this lead to his purges because he wished to maintain this cult of personality which resembled him as a demi God and it was in such interests security that he purge the party of either those who may dis agree or those mindful of times of the power struggle where the testament was revealed.However, Stalin’s personality is said to account for his suspicion which may have led to the terror as he was described as being deeply suspicious, verging on paranoia. Referring back to Khrushchev he reported that Stalin was ‘a very distrustful man, sickly suspicious, seeing everywhere about him â€Å"enemies†, â€Å"double dealers†, and â€Å"spies†. Combining with this, the suicide of his wife on the 8th November 1932 which will have convinced him even more that those around him would betray him because the women closed to him has resorted to killing herself which he will have seen as her rejecting his ideals and thus betraying him, it meant his personality became deeply suspicious.So although his personality does partially portray ideas that it was Stalin’s own ego which fuelled the terror, there was definitely and element of suspicion because of past e vents and how his peers regarded it as being natural to his personality. Alternatively, the terror can also be seen to mimic the cunningness Stalin showed at the time of the power struggle where he outwitted his opposition and thus eliminate them leading him to gain control of the communist party. First off this can be shown by the fact he wished to keep the party under his full control so he could therefore carry out his policies end edicts without question, keeping the party in a constant state of insecurity ( who would be arrested or denounced next? ) was a way of keeping control.This can be seen most by the nomenklatura around the central committee: allowed Stalin to keep his lieutenants guessing about whom he would adopt as ‘his people’. So the purges of the military allowed for this, so through this it shows Stalin’s cunningness being a reason for the purges because he used them to keep those higher up in line. However, yet again this can be seen to also mi rror the fact in how Stalin felt threatened by the growing opposition to him in the 1930’s thus it portrays how fear is still a root element to thee purges because despite his cunningness being apparent it still all comes back down to his fear as being the intrinsic reason for the terror.Contradicting this still is how Stalin’s cunningness and intellect can be seen to have instigated the purges because of the economic difficulties the Soviet Union faced at the time. Production figures from the five year plans were beginning to level off and fall behind schedule , there had been a bad harvest in 1936 (just before the start of the terror) and Stalin’s management of the economy had been criticised heavily. Stalin through the purges of the people adopted scapegoats for these failings and allowed him to pin problems on so called ‘wreckers’. Thereby Stalin was also able to shake up managers and workers which made them work much harder as they did not want to face accusation – this tied in with the Stakhanovite campaign of 1936.The terror allowed Stalin to increase workers to be more productive and encourage them to be Stakhanovite’s and demand more tools and materials to increase production rates, Through this we can see how the terror amongst the workers was fuelled by Stalin’s cunningness to manipulate the workers into working much harder and reeking greater results for Russia, so it would seem that part of the reason for the terror is in fact drawn from Stalin’s intellect and cunningness supposed to the fear and suspicion that drove the purges in other sectors. Overall Stalin’s fears and fears and suspicions heavily contributed to the terror within the USSR from 1936-39. It was the fear of losing control of the party to numerous factors such as fascism and rejection of his ideology which led him to purge the party and military.Although the purge of the workers is prominently a result of Stalinâ €™s cunningness to manipulate them in order to gain greater results in an attempt to meet his five year plans, it is the suspicion which we saw evident after the murder of Kirov that led him to purge his own party first of all and the fear of external and internal threats which led him to purge the military. In conclusion fear and suspicion heavily contributed to the extent of the terror from 1936-39 as it is so evident from the party and militarily, but it still must be acknowledged that it was not the sole reason as Stalin did cause some terror amongst workers as a result of his intellect not fear, however overall the major factor which lead to the most influential and majority of purges was in fact his fear and suspicions that dwelled with his personality and led to vindictive paranoia.

Saturday, January 4, 2020

The Organizational Of Symmetry Financial - 1361 Words

This analysis is of the organizational of Symmetry Financial. This essay will discuss the attitudes, leadership, managerial policies, and practices used by them. By using this data, I will provide a list of recommendations on how to improve the company. This analysis will describe the culture, nature of the company, motivational techniques, mores of communication used, and the emotional intelligence. I will provide information about the company to ensure the readers understand all of the different categories used to analyze the company. I will provide information on how individuals, and groups of people behave within the organization. I will be evaluating their leadership techniques and how the owners assist in the day to day running of the business. One of the most important things a business needs to be successful is happy employees. It is important for employees and managers have an established plan to deal with critical matters. They must study the behavior of their employees to decide how they will achieve their desired goals. Organizational behavior is the study of human behavior in organizational settings, the interface between human behavior and the organization, and the organization itself. We can divide organizational behavior into 3 separate categories. The first one is the individuals within the organization. The second is the work group which is made by pacing workers into specific groups. The last one is how the organization itself behaves.Show MoreRelatedThe Organization Of Symmetry Financial Essay1740 Words   |  7 PagesThis analysis is on the organization of Symmetry Financial. This essay will discuss the attitudes, leadership, managerial policies, and practices used by them. By using this data, I will provide a list of recommendations on how to improve the company. This analysis will describe the culture, nature of the company, motivational techniques, and modes of communication used. 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Friday, December 27, 2019

What is War and How Has It Affected Our World - 1538 Words

War is the strategic and organized conflict between two or more nations, countries, or groups. War is the inevitable aspect of human civilization and society as common disagreements and opinions often escalate at a parliamentary level leading to wide spread controversy between the opposing groups and eventually to war if a solution cannot be reached between the two groups. A good example of this was the widely known Second World War. Lasting between 1939 and 1945, World War 2 was the deadliest military conflict in history with over 60 million people killed alone. Adolf Hitler, the widely criticized Nazi leader of Germany at the time of World War Two, had different views than most of the Western World. His main objective was to serve the†¦show more content†¦This was mainly the reason why Germany poured massive funding and manpower into the further development of this technology and was able to harness the success earlier. Germany’s jet fighters and jet bombers were th e most feared air craft on the battlefield as the fighter jet was able to gun down on average five Allied fighter planes before being shot down. Rapid increases in the technologies of war and destructiveness like these are what made war so violent and bloodshed during the turn of the century. The scale that World War Two was fought on was much larger than that of the wars before the dawn of civilization. During this time, war was considered small scale as it was often between two small groups and was not recognized by any government or authority as there was none at the time. It wasn’t until the rise of state five thousand years ago that military activity started to happen all over the globe. The very first wars were fought with hand to hand combat often with improvised melee peripherals designed to injure the victim severely such as a spear. This was known as ancient warfare. 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Thursday, December 19, 2019

Disadvantages Of Drugs In Sports - 1102 Words

Today, sport is something that almost everyone is involved in or inspired by. When someone thinks of sport, what immediately comes into their head is winning. Nowadays, athletes are no stranger to the use of performance enhancing drugs in sports as a way to take shortcuts and beat the competition. The use of drugs in sports is wrong and creates an unfair advantage over everyone else. Moreover, it has many disadvantages and risks to the user which begs the question - what is the cost of using these drugs in sport? Performance enhancing drugs are on the rise in sports as they become more popular amongst athletes. However, most of them do not understand the threat involved in using these drugs. Performance enhancing drugs create many†¦show more content†¦Furthermore, another reason drugs should be not allowed in sports is due to the bad influence it could have on children. For children, sport is an enormous thing that consumes their life - from extracurricular activities, P.E classes at school, to parties involving sports like football. Due to their increased interest in sports, children are more likely to see and hear the news about these athletes taking drugs as acceptable practice and that it is ok for them to take them as the ‘adults’ are being allowed to. For instance, writer Jacqueline Stenson for NBC News states that, â€Å" Among students in grade 8 through 12 who admitted to using anabolic steroids in a confidential survey, 57% said professional athletes influenced their decision to use drugs and 63% said pro athletes influenced their friends’ decision to use them.† In addition to this, if they do go on to take these drugs, because of how young they are they have an even greater risk of ruining their body. As well as this, if children do start taking drugs at this young age, it will be a harder chain to break the addictiveness the drugs have on them. By allowing drugs in sports we are encouraging kids to be influenced to take drugs because of how athletes are acting. Also, it is showing children that you do not have to work hard and put time and effort into things to achieve something. Instead, you can just take shortcuts and easy ways out of things if you really want to be the best in what you do. With JacquelineShow MoreRelatedEssay about Steroids in Sports: Right or Wrong?947 Words   |  4 PagesSteroids in Sports, Right or Wrong? â€Å"We have to make some radical move to get the attention of everyone. Cheaters cant win and steroids have put us in the position that its OK to cheat.† (Lou Brock). Steroids in professional sports has became a major issue and has yet to be justified. 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The controversy of doping in sports is centered on the use of drugs to increase speed, strength, intensity and endurance. Various sports regulating bodies such as the International Olympic Committee have banned certain performance-enhancing substances because of safety and fair play issues. However, many athletes feel that they haveRead MorePreventing PEDs in Professional Sports Essay1198 Words   |  5 PagesThe use of performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) among athletes in professional sports has caused an outrage all around the world for many years. The use of PEDs not only affects the athlete that chooses to use them, but also the athletes they are competing against, other teams, and the team or country they are representing (â€Å"Survey Reveals†). It is important for athletes to maintain a good reputation in competition, because they need to represent their team in a positive manner and not create suspicionRead MoreDrugs in Sport Essay1052 Words   |  5 PagesDrugs in sport The nature of sports promotes a strong desire to win, and many athletes will do anything to rise to the top. Every elite athlete wants to get an edge over their competition, causing many athletes to turn to performance enhancing drugs to gain this edge. Drug use in sport can cost players their super stardom dream career, but more seriously, their own lives. The wide-spread illegal use of drugs has eliminated the question of which athlete has the strongest raw power, to the questionRead MoreAdvantages and Disadvantages in Sport Technology Essay711 Words   |  3 Pagesand Disadvantages of Sport Technology Technology in sports is constantly changing in today’s era. This change is making a big impact, whether the technology is a disadvantage to the sport and slows down the speed of the game or uses the technology to an advantage and speeds the game up to help make accurate calls. People are always looking for the technology to be able to get ahead of other opponents. The use of technology has crept into the athletes’ games. Technology may not be a drug butRead MoreDoping is not Dope in Athletics664 Words   |  3 PagesDoping is Not Dope Should athletes be able to use performing enhancement drugs. Many athletes are trying to get a competitive edge on their competition and some start by taking performing enhancement drugs, even though taking them could be devastating and detriment to them personally. Using performance enhancing drugs comes with many risks physically and emotionally. Performance enhancing drugs is as known as â€Å"doping†. There are many kinds of steroids such as anabolic steroids, humanRead MoreSports Enthusiasts Love And Enjoy Watching Their Favorite Team Play1335 Words   |  6 PagesSports enthusiasts love and enjoy watching their favorite team play. The best student athletes have the prestige of representing and playing for their universities. These student-athletes receive various opportunities from their universities in order to continue pursuing their higher education. However becoming a student-athlete often has some disadvantages such as not getting paid for their hard work and dedication in the field. Having a poor academic achievement, consuming drugs and steroids, andRead MoreThe Legalization Of Steroids Should Be Beneficial For The World Of Sport1226 Words   |  5 PagesSteroids seem to to be having a negative view for much of history. Steroids are drugs used by athletes to become stronger and achieve a strong physique. Steroids are illegal and are strongly discouraged to be used and may be seen first expressed during high sc hool with the introduction of organized sport teams. The perspective against the legalization of steroids believes in the many benefits of legalization. The perspective for the legalization of steroid expresses the harmful effects of steroidsRead MoreEffects Of Performance Enhancing Drug Usage In Sports1056 Words   |  5 PagesPerformance Enhancing Drug Usage in Sports: Winning at any Cost Performance Enhancing Drugs are frequently used by sporting professionals, though major sports organizations have prohibited their usage as a result of the negative attributes and effects correlated with continuous intake of these drugs. Many nations are concerned by the flourishing amount of incidents during the usage of steroids advertised by the sports athletes. Professional athletes, such as baseball players, have been in the spotlight

Tuesday, December 10, 2019

Marx vs Gilman free essay sample

Marx argued that the goal of intellectual work such as his was to change the world; an opinion obviously shared by Gilman since she was also on a mission to change the world, for women. Gilman is known for her humanist-socialist perspective but, I believe that her theories also share a similar quality to Marx’s conflict theory. Whereas Marx sees the conflict, or class struggle, being between the bourgeoisie (the owners) and the proletariat (the workers); Gilman sees the conflict, gender struggle, between men and women. Marx advocated social reform for the proletariat (workers). The focus of Marx’s conflict theory is that by eliminating privilege, the overall welfare of the society can be increased. This would then create a true equality amongst members of a society. He argues that privileged groups are working to maintain their privileges, while the disadvantaged are constantly trying to attain more. The owners are making all the profit while the workers are, basically, trading their labor for bare necessities like food, shelter and clothing. Gilman advocated social reform to women, similar to that urged earlier by Marx to workers. She recognized the inequalities inherent in the social structure of the working world which excluded women from most jobs, confining them to the world of the home where they worked all day, every day; their only compensation being the roof over their heads. They had no income over which they had complete control; and this is the situation she called on them to remedy. Although Gilman was a feminist, she believed that both men and women were victims of the damaged social structure. Women are forced to lead restricted lives, and this serves to limit their human progress; while, men suffer from behaviors that their cultural habits of dominance and power have told them are social norms. Therefore, both are victims of the social norms created by society. This concept of â€Å"equality of blame† also parallels Marx. Although he advocated for the rights and equality of the mistreated workers, he also argues that the owners were victims of the overall social structure. Society created the social classes and deemed them normal; therefore, both the owners and the workers were only playing their designated roles. The main difference in the theories of Marx and Gilman is in how we will reach this social change they preach about. Marxist philosophy is based on revolution, while Gilman’s is based on evolution. Marx believed that, through class consciousness, the workers would eventually recognize they were being exploited, and put an end to privilege. That they would revolt against their oppressors and end Capitalism once and for all; and a new utopia of equality under Communism would emerge. While Gilman believed that, women would not have a revolution against the men, but we would â€Å"evolve† into equality. Society would over time, as women became more economically independent, balance its injustices. Then, women would finally be free to develop as individuals, and to offer their untapped resources to their families and society as a whole. So, in modern day society, if we have â€Å"evolved† or â€Å"revolted† into equality; why are women still paid less than men in the same jobs? What would Marx and Gilman have to say about the subject? Even in the 19th century, Marx pointed to the tendency for capitalism to make super-profits from the exploitation of women and children. He wrote: The labor of women was the first thing sought for by capitalists who used machinery. † (Marx, Capital) He would argue that the capitalists constant attempt to increase the rate of profit, has led to the ever increasing employment of women. The capitalist system regards women merely as a convenient source of cheap labor. Since, in the past, women were conditioned by class society to be politically indifferent, unorganized and passive; they are easily taken advantage of. They believe that women won’t complain like the men do, because they are weaker. Therefore, they can pay them less and increase their own profit margin without hassle. And, despite all the talk about a womans world and girl power, and despite all the laws that supposedly guarantee equality, women workers remain the most exploited and oppressed section of the proletariat. Gilman would, no doubt, rejoice in the fact that so many women are out of their homes, in the work force, and independent from men; regardless of any pay differences. And, she would surely embrace the idea of â€Å"woman’s world† and â€Å"girl power†; and see this as proof that she was right and that women were evolving. I theorize that she would be less concerned with the pay differences as long as women could still be economically important and independent. But she would see the pay differences between men and women as yet another stumbling block on the way to equality; another way that the patriarchal society is oppressing women by showing their power and dominance as men.

Tuesday, December 3, 2019

Sex, Lies and Conversation Why is it so Hard for Men and Women to Talk to Each Other Essay Example

Sex, Lies and Conversation: Why is it so Hard for Men and Women to Talk to Each Other Paper From the beginning of history of humankind gender differences have been one of the most fascinating topics for the philosophers, and scientists. Tons of books were written on this topic, and thousands of movies were filmed, but still, the secret of the relationship between men and women hasnt been revealed. The only thing that all of those books, articles, and movies achieved, is that nowadays people are certain that men and women are totally different. Some science fiction writers even made an assumption than males and females are different species, which need each other in order to reproduce.It’s a obvious that language is one of the main means of communication humans use. Some researchers presume that it is language that creates most of misunderstandings between females and males. The reason is that men and women express their thoughts differently, using different verbal and non-verbal means.Lets review the most uncomplicated example, a situation described in Samuel Shems b ook We Have to Talk: Healing Dialogues Between Men and Women. He writes about the workshop organized for couples to improve their communicational skills with the opposite gender. When the organizers of the workshop asked the group to break into the same-gender groups, people looked relieved. When, afterwards, they were given the task, groups of woman and groups of man behaved themselves differently: men shook hands, sat down, and began to write their individual answers, while woman started to talk noisily in small groups, laughing, and waving hands (1999, p.14).;Analyzing this observation we can conclude that women are more into group decisions, while men prefer the individual ones. Moreover, woman express more emotion while trying to solve a problem, they have lots of associations connected with it, which they tend to express immediately. Consequently, it is no wonder that the communication between the representatives of two genders is so complicated sometimes. The strategies of co mmunication men and women use are different, so that it is not easy for them to understand each other.Nevertheless, an objection appears concerning the statement that man tend to talk less than women do. Deborah Tannen illustrated it in her article Sex, Lies and Conversation; Why Is It So Hard for Men and Women to Talk to Each Other? She described the situation which happened in one of her workgroups. The group of woman invited men to join them, and, throughout the evening, one man was particularly talkative, and his wife sit silently beside him. When in the end of the evening the author concluded that women frequently complain that their husbands dont talk to them, this man agrees to her, and said that his wife was the a chatterbox in their family. The author concluded that: although American men tend to talk more than women in public situations, they often talk less at home. And this pattern is wreaking havoc with marriage. (1990).Its true that many women feel their husbands talk too little to them. The situation when a husband comes back home from work, and has nothing to say to his wife, is frequent in American families. The researchers have different opinions about the origins of this fact, but it is most likely that men just dont have common topics with their wives. They know what topics they should cover when they communicate with their colleagues, regardless of their gender, also they have lots of thing to talk about with their friends, but men often just dont understand what they should discuss with their women.Deborah Tannen proposes a very convincing explanation for this fact. She says that:For males, conversation is the way you negotiate your status in the group and keep people from pushing you around; you use talk to preserve your independence. Females, on the other hand, use conversation to negotiate closeness and intimacy; talk is the essence of intimacy, so being best friends means sitting and talking. For boys, activities, doing things togethe r, are central. Just sitting and talking is not an essential part of friendship. Theyre friends with the boys they do things withIt is also that for men communication means exhibiting information, which is the mean of maintaining social status. On the contrary, women see communication as transferring emotions and attitudes (2001, p.55-57). Thus men and women often just dont understand what their partner wants from them.The social status of women is usually different from that of men, thus they earn it be the means different from that men use. It is not obligatory for woman to convey information when she talks to somebody. She is more into transferring her feelings, emotions, and attitudes. In the same time, women who purport on the social status same to that males have, she has to change her communicational style.Despite of the gender and sexual revolution that have taken place in our society during the past century, men still take most of the highest positions worldwide. Thus the r equirements a human being has to fulfill for to get the high status are also set by males. As we have already noted, for men conveying information is the mean of maintaining social status. Thus, a woman who claims to have a high social status also has to learn to talk like men do. The observations indicate that lots of women are able of taking possession of this skill, in the same time being able to communicate in the feminine style. Unfortunately, little man care enough for to try to learn to talk like women do, as it is disrespected among males.J.B. Priestly, the English writer, has an opinion somehow different from that discussed above. He states that:[Women] remain more personal in their interests and less concerned with abstractions than men on the same level of intelligence and culture†¦. It is the habit of men to be overconfident in their impartiality, to believe that they are god-like intellects, detached from desires and hopes and fears and disturbing memories, general izing and delivering judgment in a serene mid-air (1926).Thus women mostly prefer to talk about the mundane things, like cooking, gardening, or clothes, while men usually cover topics like freedom, governing or philosophy. Women rarely convince their surroundings that their opinion is the only true. It is also that women can communicate freely if their views on many things differ.For man the situation is different. Males mostly talk with those, who agree with them in the majority of points. If the situation is different, they either try to persuade their opponent, or just stop communicating with him or her. For men conversation is often a form of a contest, while women perceive as one of the means of establishing and maintaining a relationship.This difference in perceiving communication is the reason for most of the misunderstandings men and women have. Those misunderstandings can ruin a marriage, or friendship. They also can create severe troubles during the working process. Solvin g them is a vital task for maintaining peace and understanding in ones life.Considering all the facts and theories listed, it is no wonder that men and women often have troubles talking. The reason for that is that they pursue different goals during this process, and their strategies are also different. Nevertheless, there are happy couples, both family and professional ones, who develop their own strategies of conveying their thoughts, ideas and emotions to each other. Likewise there are men and women who have close friends among the representatives of the opposite sex. Thus we can conclude that successful communication between man and woman is actually possible, and that we just have to spend a little time and effort for designing the one that will suit our specific case, as there are no decisions that suit all in this sphere.